5 years ago#1
Guest
Guest

Winchester model 67 single shot .22 bolt action rifle. Very nicely done refinished wood stock and very good bluing overall. Excellent bore. What's it worth to a private buyer?

Posted on Winchester
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4 years ago#2
dan mccall
Guest

how much is average value of a wunchester 67 rifle

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4 years ago#3
Evil twin
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I have seen similar model 67 Winchester single shots selling for approx. $150.00 at gun shows, and The blue book of Gun Values shows a value of an original condition, 98% Model standard Model 67 Winchester at $200.00

There are other variables involved in evaluating a Model 67 Winchester - It came standard with a 27" barrel, however, there was also a 20" barreled "Boys Rifle" that adds 25% to the value. There was also a limited run of 67s that were chambered for the now obsolete .22WRF shell (one of the two 67s I now own was given to me by my grandfather, and it is chambered in this caliber) A 67 in this .22WRF caliber doubles the value of the gun. Winchester still occasionally makes a limited run of ammunition in this caliber, but the shells are usually somewhat expensive $9.00 - $10.00 a box. Guns in this caliber are marked .22WRF as opposed to the standard marking .22 short, long and long rifle.

The gun was also chambered in a .22 smooth bore for shot shells, and a gun in this smooth bore chambering is valued 100% to 150% above the standard rifle value.

As a side note - I have a particular fondness for the older Winchester .22 single shot rifles, and at an early age- spent many hours plinking, and hunting with a Model 67 They are a well made quality firearm, with a walnut stock - a new similar quality single shot would cost $275.00 or more these days. This is a great first gun for young shooters as long as the stock isn't too long for them, as it has to be loaded and cocked for every shot, and being a single shot rifle - it helps to teach accurate, careful aiming, and firing control, and helps to discourage the compulsion to blast away at a target (like you sometimes see with a young shooter firing a semi-auto).

I hope that this info. is helpful.

Evil Twin

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4 years ago#4
jimmypags
Guest

Evil Twin,

It sounds like you know the Winchester model 67-22 very well so I thought I'd ask you a few questions. I agree with your assessment about this being the perfect gun to teach a kid to shoot thats why I bought it. It has the 27 inch barrel but the one of the odd things about it is that it doesn't have any bluing on the barrel or receiver, it's plain metal but doesn't show any rust. I was wondering if they nickel plated it or something.

The other thing I find odd, and I had a difficult time trying to explain to my daughter how to properly align the sights, is that the front sight has a blade that sits on top of a hole that resembles a peep sight but in the front instead of the rear. The rear sight is adjustable with a piece of metal that will slide up and down. It looks like you can chose (by flipping it upside down) a narrow notch or wide notch. Just wondering if these sights are common or they were after market, I've never seen them before and I wasn't sure myself how to align them.

Thanks

Jim

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4 years ago#5
Evil Twin 67 Winchester
Guest

Jimmy,

The best way that I have found to explain proper sight alignment of a typical open sight is to draw a 6" circle on a piece of paper, with a smaller circle inside (to provide a bulls-eye) Then draw the front sight post so the bead or top of the front sight post is centered in the center circle. Then draw the rear sight opening so the front sight is centered in the notch opening of the rear sight (should be the picture that you see when you are aiming)- This is the way that I taught my grandchildren, and is the same method used by firearms instructors. - (Side note)- some people prefer a 6 o-clock aiming position (with the sights centered just below the center of the bulls-eye.

As for the finish on your gun - It may be plated, but it may just have been buffed or stripped of all finish, and what you may be seeing is just bare polished steel. If you really want to know buy some cold bluing solution, and remove the barreled action from the stock. with a Q-tip dab a small dot of the solution on the under side of the barrel - near the action. If it turns blue - it's bare metal, if it won't take blue it is plated with either chrome or nickel.

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4 years ago#6
Evil Twin 67 Winchester
Guest

Jimmy,

I went back and re-read your post, and I am slightly confused about the explanation of your sights. It's hard to tell what you mean without actually seeing a picture of the sights. The standard rear sight on the 67 Winchester can be drifted right or left in the dovetail it sits in by using a small piece of brass or other soft metal and a small hammer,(to change windage, or left/right point of impact of the bullet. The sight uses a sliding sight elevator that can be moved back and forth to raise or lower the rear sight, to change elevation.

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4 years ago#7
jimmypags
Guest

Evil Twin,

Thank you for your time answering the questions I had. FYI; I've had 40+ years of experience with open iron sight alignment. I just never saw this configuration before. I've come to the conclusion that someone removed the bluing by sanding it off and also replaced the stock sights with ridiculous after market ones that don't appear to match up front and rear. The rear sight flips up and down on a swivel and there is a round peep (as a front sight) I'm a six o'clock target shooter and I couldn't get these sights zeroed in at all. It doesn't matter because at this point both of my daughters have moved on to shooting newer guns and I'm probably destroy the gun as it's taking up space in my safe and it's not worth restoring.

Thank you

Jim

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