3 years ago #1
Mr. Todd
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I have the above .22 rifle, and am interested in the approximate value. Pictures attached. I thought I had a picture of hte rear sight, but I do not.

Posted on Winchester
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3 years ago #2
Bert H.
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Hello,

The rear peep sight is important to the value of the rifle. Can you post a clear close-up picture of it?

Bert H.

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3 years ago #3
Mr. Todd
Guest

I sort of thought so, which is why I took a picture of it so I thought. I do believe that this is one of the earlier productions correct? I was able to get a hold of the attached pics. One is better than the other. Any idea what the correct Patent Dates really are? I think the "9's" look like "2's" or visa versa.

And in case you were wondering, those are not my feet wtih the painted toenails, my wife took those while I was at work. LOL

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3 years ago #4
Mr. Todd
Guest

A couple more Pics of the rear sight.

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3 years ago #5
Bert H.
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Todd,

I do not recognise the rear peep sight. It is not listed or shown in any of the original Winchester catalogs of the same vintage as the rifle.

Speaking of the vintage, your Model 1904 was manufactured sometime in the 1914 to April 1919 time frame.

The Patent date is "1899" and it was originally assigned to John M. Browning.

The value is in the $200 - $300 range.

Bert H.

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3 years ago #6
Mr. Todd
Guest

Thank you very much for replying. I guess that means I have a vary rare model possibly, or that some customization was done which might lower the value hey?

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3 years ago #7
Bert H.
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Todd,

The rear sight is not a Winchester item, so yes, it does reduce the value a bit.

As for the rifle being rare, it is not. Winchester manufactured 302,859 of them in the years 1904 - 1931. Other than the non-factory original rear sight, it is perfectly normal.

Bert H.

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3 years ago #8
drizzow
Guest

if you would like to sell it I might be interested in it

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3 years ago #9
Mr. Todd
Guest

I appreciate your interest, but I am unclear on what a fair value is yet. I am located in the Milwaukee area of Wisconsin by the way. Can I ask what interests you in the rifle?

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3 years ago #10
drizzow
Guest

nothing in particular just thought you wanted to sell it

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3 years ago #11
Mr. Todd
Guest

I would feel more comfortable selling it if I was more sure of the value. Where are you located?

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3 years ago #12
Bert H.
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Todd,

As I stated before, the value is in the $200 - $300 range, and it will be tough getting the upper number.

Bert H.

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3 years ago #13
A.B.
Guest

Where can I get a diagram for Winchester .22 Model 04? I need to work on the ejector and clean it.

Thanks,
A.B.

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3 years ago #14
Bert H.
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A.B. wrote:
Where can I get a diagram for Winchester .22 Model 04? I need to work on the ejector and clean it.

Thanks,
A.B.


The Model 1904 (04) is a very simplistic design. If you are the slightest bit mechanically inclined, it is very simple to dissassemble and work on. Remove the barreled action from the stock, and you will quickly see what makes it tick.

Bert H.
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3 years ago #15
A.B.
Guest

Bert,

Myself and 4 other guys have not been able to figure out how to take the pull back barrel action off. Any help would be appreciated.

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3 years ago #16
Bert H.
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Hello A.B.,

There is a single large knurled head screw on the bottom of the stock forward of the trigger guard. Unscrew it fully, and simply lift the barreled action out of the stock. If it has not been pulled apart in several decades, there is most likely a crud buildup between the stock and barrel. Carefully pull them apart.

Again, once you get the barreled action out of the stock, the barrel and action assembly are quite simple to take apart. To remove the bolt, open it fully and pull it to the rear until it stops. Then pull down slightly (against spring pressure) on the extractor/bolt-stop piece located under the bolt and then pull the bolt completely out. To remove the extractor/bolt-stop piece, turn the barrel assembly upside down, then gently pull up on the flat spring and pull the extractor/bolt-stop piece up and to the rear. That is all the further you need to disassemble it (unless the flat spring is filthy or corroded).

Bert H.

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