5 years ago #1
Guest
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what is a winchester 1911 sl shotgun worth? It is a 2 piec model A 4940 Nickel Steel 12 gauge full choke shotgun

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5 years ago #2
Bert H.
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Hello,

The Winchester Model 1911 is without question the absolute worst firearm that Winchester ever produced, and it was an abysmal failure.

During its brief production run (1911 - 1925), Winchester was forced to make more than (85) design changes to the receiver/action group due to continual failures, and for the very first time, they lost money on a model.

Today, there is no interest in them within the Winchester collecting community, and they can not be safely shot with modern 12 gauge shells, so the shooters avoid them as well. Essentially, the Model 1911 is a "wall hanger".

I see them over and over again on gun show tables regularly for $100 - $200, with no takers.

Sorry the news is so grim.

Bert H.

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4 years ago #3
chad
Guest

ive owned a win 1911sl for 8 years, ive went hunting with no problems. It has shot 00 buck, slugs, and bird shot. It hasnt never worried me about malfunctions or misfires, and still can shot a full load of shells out. The stock is cracked some, and the reciever release button needs a little work but seems to fire ok with modern shells. Is the value of it any different than one that wont fire

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4 years ago #4
Bert H.
Scholar
Blogs: 15
Forum: 24,116
Votes: 720

Hello Chad,

In answer to your question about the value, No, it is not worth anything extra because it can still fire. Most of them I see can still be fired. With the diet you are feeding that gun, it is on borrowed time.

Bert H.

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3 years ago #5
captnsquid
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My grandfather had one on the farm in Ormstown Quebec.I have it now. It was used for many years for upland birds and duck. I started to use it for a time 10 years after he passed away. I always though it was a great and unique gun. Like my grandfather if we saw it fly, it was in the game bag. The fore stock is cracked and the gun still works well. But I used light loads only. I have not hunted it for 40 years but use to take it trap shooting often.It has sentimental value for me so I will hang onto it. Yes it does kick like a mule. Thanks for your information.
Ron

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3 years ago #6
ARNOLD
Guest

MY FATHER JUST GAVE HIS 1911 TO MY NEPHEW. WHEN HE BOUGHT IT 50 YRS AGO THE OWNER CALLED IT "THE WIDOW MAKER" BECAUSE IT WAS SO HARD TO PULL BACK.

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2 years ago #7
Kim
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It was called the Widowmaker NOT because it was hard to pull the barrel back to cock it, but because some very stupid people couldn't cock it normally and decided to put the butt on the ground and push it down whilst hoving their face over the muzzle. In that position, it was able to slamfire and that was the end of the ***** head. Widow...made.
It was the first gun to ever be recalled in the US I believe. I am 56 now and still have my great-uncle's old 1911SL that he bought in 1911. He gave it to my Dad and Dad gave to me at 14 plus I got a couple more to play with and for parts over the past few years. I have two shooters and a nice wallhanger now.
I never blew my own head off cuz I wasn't stupid, even at 14. Got one helluvalotta pheasants and ducks and doves with that old boomer though.
Value? about $100-150 but to me they are priceless. :~)

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2 years ago #8
scott
Guest

The 1911 is like any gun its value is normally sentimental and all dangerous to idiots, please don't degrade it.

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2 years ago #9
Larry
Guest

This was the first shotgun I shot, and the first shotgun I hunted with. My father purchased it in an Atlanta pawn shop in the 1930's. He hunted quail commercially with this gun for several years, sometimes killing several hundred in one day. He shot this gun so much, the cylinder barrel is noticably worn much thinner than it was originally. (A full choke barrel also came with the gun.) As a teenager, I started hunting ducks with this gun. I used this gun or another borrowed gun until my father got me a Winchester model 12 pump with a solid rib and a Weaver choke. The 1911 gun is one of the best shooting shotguns I ever experienced. After thousands of rounds put through this gun, only one repair was ever made. It failed to fully eject in the mid-1950's, and the gunsmith repaired it in a few minutes with a well placed weld. This gun has not been used in years, now, but the last time I took it out, I won a turkey at a turkey shoot. The bad reputation surrounding this gun concerning reliability issues never applied to our family, and the "Widow Maker" reputatiion because of the loading procedure was not a factor because of the safe handling rules we always followed. I feel this was a much maligned gun, and received an undeserved reputation. Shotguns I currently also own include a Beretta AL2 (300),Ithaca 37 Skeet, Remington Model 11, Winchester 101 20 ga, Winchester Model 59, Acme double barrel, Hercules 20 Ga. and Mossberg Maverick. I sold a Winchester Model 12 and a Winchester Model 97.

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1 year ago #10
Robert
Guest

I have also had good luck with the 1911. I use it for trap shooting and I've found that it performs just as well as any modern shotgun of similar value. The full choke makes it very accurate. I prefer it over the Remington 870 because of its better weight distribution.

Although it has some kick and takes a little effort to load, I find this is not a problem for me. I have plenty of shoulder muscle to absorb the recoil, and I'm strong enough to cock it without needing to brace the butt end.

I will certainly admit that this gun isn't right for everyone, but I reject the idea that this design is an abysmal failure. The gun does exactly what it needs to do: shoot. It should always be handled with respect, and by people who are physically capable of handling it.

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1 year ago #11
Ron
Guest

I recall years ago I could not find ant thing on this model. This same shotgun was a WW1 army issue with a bayonet attachment. Used as a Trench Sweeper. That model would be nice to own, as it is so rare.

Nice to find other who after coming across this model feel something special towsrds such a shot gun. Due to the fact that it was handed down by family.

Then when you get down to it, guns are not idiot proof.
Handle with care and respect.

Now a days it sure smashes up those trap flies. At 64 it makes for a tender shoulder the next day. Most of that is from getting the shot away in a hurry before the old girl is well situated into the shoulder.

Take care, Ron

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1 year ago #12
Jeff Meserve
Guest

I have owned a 1911sl for about 20 years,it was given to my granddad as a wedding gift by my greatgranddad in 1939,he gave it to me just before he passed. I have hunted with this shotgun ever since,it has put down many white tailed deer,I use only 2 3/4 slugs and 00 buck shot,never had any issues with this gun,perfect performer year after year.....

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1 year ago #13
Ron Cairns
Guest

I have used SSG or double ought buck and it handled and performed well. I use to take it to the range and warm up the barrel with a few slugs. When C.I.L. Imperial was making shot shells, My father used in his JV Higgins Auto Loader. C.I.L made a line called "Canuck" It was a lighter load. It worked well for me over the years.
Always nice to hear from folks that have seen and used this shotgun.
All the best,
Ron

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1 year ago #14
gary weber
Guest

i have my dads winchester 1911.s.l how much is it worth if i was going to sell it??

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1 year ago #15
Ron Cairns
Guest

Hello Gary,
Reading replies from others over the years many are not a fan of this shotgun. They call it the widow maker and that is you have to push the barrel into the breech. Some sd this in the upright position while cocking the shot gun and it went off giving the user a excedrin headache #1. Also the recoil was such after a time it would crack the forestock as mine is. Heavy loads were hard on the buffer in the mechanism that was made of leather rings. They wear adding to a big recoil. Many say collectors have it in there collection and should be used as a show model only. The rate the price for this firearm at $150 to lucky $200 bucks.
Best to keep it as a heirloom, get it checked over and use it. Just be careful how you cock it, keeping the sliding barrel away from things you do not want to shoot. Cheers

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1 month ago #16
Tim
Guest

I dissagree with some of your points,my grand father and great uncle both bought new 1911's in the 20's,I have my grand fathers two barrel sets.granted they were not of the best design for the time but the statement about not holding up under modern loads is not true,I think most of this guns bad reputation is hearsay and propaganda from other manufacturers,not to say an idiot couldnt hurt him self with one,later winchester recalled the guns and offered a gunsmith install only bolt handle for charging but hardly anyone took advantage.The dynamics of an auto reloading gun in that day was new and a challenge. I am inpressed by the machining of the front sight in the barrel and the thinness of the bore,a testement to high tolerances during manufacturing.For a walk in the field for birds or rabbits I would as soon pick up the 1100 as any other vintage gun,it shoots the best and always gets attention.

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