3 years ago#1
forester2
Guest

I have a double barrell rabbit ear shotgun with the name Washington Arms with fine belgian damascus on the barrell. It is stamped 12. Any info would be appreciated.

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3 years ago#2
rboatright
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According to the information in my notes file from previous on-line searches, the gun was made for and sold by the E.K. Tryon Jr. & Company of Philadelphia,PA.

Several sources suggest that it may have been made by Crescent Fire Arms Company of Norwich,CT (1892 to 1931)

It could also have been a H & D Folsom import.

To tell if it was an import, look at the bottom of the barrels under the forearm for proof marks. If the gun was made by Crescent there will be no proofs. If it was made in Belgium there will be the letters "ELG" in an oval with a crown over that.

You can see more history of Folsom and Crescent trade-name guns at this link: http://www.picturetrail.com/sfx/album/view/20091267

That site also confirms Washington as a trade name for EK Tryon possibly from both sources.

That site also has pictures.

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3 years ago#3
foresster2
Guest

The barrell has the elg with the crown prof mark. How collectible is this type of gun?

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3 years ago#4
rboatright
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Basically, it has no collectors interest. Folsum was a mass importer of inexpensive utility guns which were stamped with any name someone wanted on them. Folsum and Crescent would stamp a name on as few as twelve guns if you were willing to pay for the stamp.

They're not BAD guns, but the collectors interest is near zero. That's not to say that there isn't someone out there who has a wild hare to amass a collection of every mark Folsum ever used, but I've never heard of them.

The guns value is quite low, and it is a damascus barrel black-powder only gun and not safe to shoot. The problem is, the gun was built up from a spiral of steel welded into a tube, and there's really no telling if the first owner cleaned it well or if there is hidden rust between the laminations without spending a LOT of money, or risking the gun and firing a proof shot remotely.

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3 years ago#5
forester2
Guest

Thanks for the info

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9 months ago#6
Nicole
Guest

I have the same gun with no markings on the bottom how much is mine worth?

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9 months ago#7
two old dogs
Guru
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Nicole: Shotguns of this era may have Damascus, Twist or Laminated Steel barrels which are not considered safe with modern ammunition.

Even if the gun has fluid steel barrels, the chambers may be shorter than today’s 2 3/4″ length shells. If using is contemplated, an evaluation by a competent gunsmith to determine barrel steel composition and chamber length is recommended. Modern 2 ¾” shells fired in a short chamber produces dangerously high pressures and can damage the gun and injure the shooter or bystanders. If deemed safe to use, only light field or target loads can be recommended.

Shotguns of this era may have Damascus, Twist or Laminated Steel barrels which are not considered safe with modern ammunition.

Even if the gun has fluid steel barrels, the chambers may be shorter than today’s 2 3/4″ length shells. If using is contemplated, an evaluation by a competent gunsmith to determine barrel steel composition and chamber length is recommended. Modern 2 ¾” shells fired in a short chamber produces dangerously high pressures and can damage the gun and injure the shooter or bystanders. If deemed safe to use, only light field or target loads can be recommended.

Retail value for a gun in good or better condition would range from $75 to $200 depending on mechanical and bore condition and remaining original wood and metal finish.

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