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5 years ago #1
DAVID29
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I have a J. Stevens A. & T. Co
Chicopee Falls. Mass. USA Pat. APR, 17.94 22 long rifle, single shot hex, hex barrel, under the lever it has V 6, 4 bolts on left side, says stevens favorite on butt. Its in mid grade condition. Im lookin to find a vaule and a little background.

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5 years ago #2
phil
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did you ever get any info? i have the same gun up untill the under lever. mine is A 4701 anyone have any info

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4 years ago #3
Mickey
Guest

I have a similar model in about the same shape. I was told by a gunsmith after he looked it up in a book that it's worth about $125 to "the right person". He said he would keep it as a conversation peice and also go shoot it with regular 22 ammo, not the newer high speed stuff.
Sweet little rifle but I doubt I will ever shoot it or register it!

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4 years ago #4
rboatright
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The Stevens Favorite falling block rifle is one of the longest made firearms in the world.

Beginning in 1880, the company began making falling block rifles in little known obsolete calibers like .25 Stevens and .30 rimfire.

These rifles, though less well known than Ballard or Winchester firearms, were of comparable quality. The rifles were also priced lower than those of Ballard or Winchester, making the Stevens' falling block models competitive in the marketplace.

Under names like Favorite, Little Scout, Crackshot and Marksman, Stevens sold millions of reliable single-shot firearms. The total number of single-shot firearms manufactured by the company exceeded 3.5 million by 1892!! (Two years before the introduction of the .22 LR Favorite!)

In addition, in 1887, Stevens developed the .22LR round. The .22LR cartridge was available commercially beginning in 1888, in the the Favorite starting in 1894.

The .22LR history starts with the Favorite made from 1894 till 1935. Plain straight-grip stock, small tapered forearm.

Then, you have the Crack Shot "boys" Favorite variants that are the same action made from 1913 to 1939 , and the various "Ideal" rifles which had the same action made from 1894 to 1932.

There was also a pistol variant.

There are none with "hex" barrels.

Then, in 1971 Savage re-introduced the 1915 version of the Favorite in tribute to the cenntennial of Joshua Stevens the "Father of the .22"

The 30g favorite is still being made today!

Value:

The vast majority of various Favorite's on gunbroker sell in the range of $170 to $300 depending on condition and exact model, HOWEVER, there are Favorites which go MUCH HIGHER, as high as $2000 (Two Thousand Dollars), especially the early versions made before 1900. For a detailed value estimate, you will need to post details and photos of your gun.

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4 years ago #5
1867
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yes, this blog was helpful. how can i find out when my favorite was made? it has 1867 on the stock bracket just behind the lever and trigger...

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4 years ago #6
rboatright
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You need to post details of the gun

First: post EVERY WORD, Every letter, and describe every odd mark anywhere on the gun.

Second: Describe the gun. How long is the barrel? Is it round or Octagonal or half-round?

How long is the stock? Is the end of the stock flat or shaped like a ( ?

What is the condition of the gun? Is it rusted at all? is any of the original blue or black finish left on the gun? How much? Is it scratched? How much? Is it pitted? How much? If you shine a light down the barrel can you see the rifling? How clearly?

What is the condition of the stock? Is it worn? Is it scratched? Does it have stuff carved into it?

Of course, the easiest way to do this is to take and post good photos of the gun, including photos of any words or marks that are close enough to read...

DO NOT USE A WHITE BACKGROUND, find something tan or grey.

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4 years ago #7
Frenchy Cannuck
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My uncle owns one of these, here is the information I have on it.

J. Stevens A & T Co.
Chicopee Falls Mass U.S.A. Pat. Apr 17 94
22 Long Rifle

Under the lever are the letter "K" and the number 29.

Barrel hasn't been mesured but looks to be aproximately 24" and is half Octagonal and half Round.

On the butt it says "Stevens Favorite" can't remember the shape of it, it would be approximately 18".

It's a take down model.

The wood is in good condition no cracks just a few dings and dents colour is nice and rich, no excessive wear.

The receiver retains some Case Hardened Blue, no scratches.

A little rust on the barrel, very little. I have not seen the inside of the barrel.

Can you tell me when it was manufactured and an approximate value?

I'll get some pics for a better fix on the price.

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4 years ago #8
rboatright
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Well, the version of Steven's name on the gun places it between 1886 and 1915.

the "patent date" and that date makes it a Favorite model 1894.

Now, how early or late was it?

The top side rear of the receiver at the top flat at the rear of the barrel (at the hammer area) had a more square corner on the early guns. The next version in succession had a short threaded section on the barrel in front of the receiver & utilized a thin knurled ring that threaded onto the barrel at the juncture against the receiver front. This ring could be adjusted to position the barrel rearward enough to put more pressure against the breechblock, putting enough tension to keep the lever from drooping if the linkage became worn. Later guns used a spring loaded plunger inside the lever that put tension on the link. Then still later the whole adjustment system was dropped.

The takedown screw head recesses into receiver & has a wire loop in the head of the screw. The forward lower section of the receiver from the lever pivot screw to the front where it mates to the forearm was a short radius.

All of the receivers for all variations were drilled & tapped for a tang peep sight, using small screws.

I know you don't know the barrel condition, but if the barrel is the only problem, and you want a shooter, favorites are absolutely candidates for a reline.

since the .22 versions are the only ones that can be shot, since no one makes .25 stevens rimfire any more and .32 rimfire is also unavailable, the .22's are the most valuable.

For 1894's in .22 in good condition for early variants recent gunbroker prices have run from $400 to $600. If yours is a "ladys" model (checkered walnut stock and Swiss buttplate) the value could be higher. Even in fairly poor condition with damaged stocks value for this particular model doesn't go below $150. See this gunbroker auction for an example

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4 years ago #9
1867
Guest

thankyou very much for the info. it was very helpful. i will put together all info i can get off the gun and get back.

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4 years ago #10
david
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need price value on 1929

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4 years ago #11
BRIAN ARKANSAS
Guest

I HAVE A MARKSMAN12. DOES ANYONE KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT THE GUN
?

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4 years ago #12
Dad's rifle
Guest

Mine was owned by my father in the early '30s and was assuredly not the first owner. The family was definitely cash poor. I'm not familiar with the official terminology for firearms, but here you go:

Half-octagonal barrel. On the top flat reads "J STEVENS A & T CO" and under that in smaller print, "CHICOPEE FALLS, MASS. U.S.A. PAT APR 17 94."

On the left upper flat it reads "3240".

On thne bottom of the barrel at the very back is "29495".

There are no other markings or writing on the gun.

The lever is S-shaped, the buttstock has a highly "chair shape" (with the rifle held vertically). The buttplate has no markings but is deeply curved.

Overall, the rifle is in very good used condition, having been well cared for but well used as well. It's not showroom condition.

There's no rust whatsoever and all the mechanisms are smooth and well oiled.

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4 years ago #13
rboatright
Guest

Again, a Stevens Favorite model 1894, and again, not enough info to be absolutely certain which variant you have.

Can you possibly post a photo? When you say "deeply curved" -- How deeply?

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4 years ago #14
Dad's rifle
Guest

Wow, that was quick.

Measuring the buttplate with a straightedge across the top and bottom "point", it's more than an inch deep. It doesn't sound like much, I suppose, but looks very unusual to me.

I'll photograph it soon and post it.

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4 years ago #15
rboatright
Guest

That's not as deep as some. Some of the "Shutzen" variants have curves as deep as four inches.

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4 years ago #16
Dad\'s rifle
Guest

Here's the Stevens Favorite model 1894 in question.

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4 years ago #17
Dad\\\'s rifle
Guest

Attached are pictures of the Stevens Favorite model 1894 in question.

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4 years ago #18
Frenchy Cannuck
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Frenchy Cannuck wrote:
My uncle owns one of these, here is the information I have on it.

J. Stevens A & T Co.
Chicopee Falls Mass U.S.A. Pat. Apr 17 94
22 Long Rifle

Under the lever are the letter "K" and the number 29.

Barrel hasn't been mesured but looks to be aproximately 24" and is half Octagonal and half Round.

On the butt it says "Stevens Favorite" can't remember the shape of it, it would be approximately 18".

It's a take down model.

The wood is in good condition no cracks just a few dings and dents colour is nice and rich, no excessive wear.

The receiver retains some Case Hardened Blue, no scratches.

A little rust on the barrel, very little. I have not seen the inside of the barrel.

Can you tell me when it was manufactured and an approximate value?

I'll get some pics for a better fix on the price.


Here are the pics.
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4 years ago #19
Frenchy Cannuck
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Hey Ace I did finally get some pics up check out Linkback 18.
Can you tell me more?
Thanks

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4 years ago #20
rboatright
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Your Stevens Favorite 1894 is a model 17.

It's in fair to good condition. I'm really worried when I look at your photos that there has been substantial rust on the gun which has been cleaned off.

There is absolutely no case color on the top of the receiver, or on the sides. There are rings of rust around the screws, but the screws have dark-blue heads without the slightest hint of wear and utterly sharp slot edges. The side of the hammer and the breech are rough and very worn. Here's a picture of a more normal breech and hammer.

I can't tell the condition of the barrel, but from the image you posted of the whole gun the barrel looks VERY dark, and I suspect has been re-blued.

The stock is oil stained at the place where it attaches to the receiver and the rest of the stock seems to have dings and dents on it even tho it is VERY shiny in the lights you used. That seems inconsistent. There doesn't appear to be anywhere were the finish was worn off the stock.

That suggests that the stock has also been refinished.

Now, take a look at the gun in this auction which sold for $285
http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.aspx? Item=221103750

it's in MUCH better shape than your gun.

If I had to assign a retail value to your gun, I would say $150 to $175.

If I were going to insure it, I would insure it for $300.

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4 years ago #21
Frenchy Cannuck
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Thanks for the great info. Can you give me an idea of the year of production?

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4 years ago #22
rboatright
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1896 to 1915

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3 years ago #23
Chuck
Guest

I have one just like your pictures. Missing the sight on the octagon barrel side. Let me know what else you find out about it. I would like to shoot it. Do you know of any reliable gunsmiths?

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3 years ago #24
rattski
Guest

its practically worthless

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3 years ago #25
ethan p
Guest

I just bought a model 44 stevens but from all of the researching i have done i cannot date the gun due to the fact that it only says stevens on it it doesnt say j stevens or anything it just says stevens and on the side says LR 22 and it is half octagonal can you please help me date this gun

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3 years ago #26
rboatright
Guest

post 1940.

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3 years ago #27
jetcarbob
Guest

I have same gun with #741 anyone have a current value?

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3 years ago #28
Jeff
Guest

I received one of these to work on....I think some of the parts are missing. Is there any way possible you would be willing to take rear stock off and shoot some photos of the parts in there correct position. The schematics that are available only show parts list. Thanks so much. The problem is the hammer has no power when it falls against the block. It appears that there should be some spring to force the hammer down on the breech. Any help would be gladly accepted. I think it is the model 17

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3 years ago #29
Lightning
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rboatright wrote:

There are none with "hex" barrels.

There is a Favorite model with a hex barrel tho.
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3 years ago #30
JP@AK
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Lightning wrote:
There is a Favorite model with a hex barrel tho.

Actually, Boatright is correct.
This rifle does not have a "hex" barrel (six sides), it has an octagon barrel (eight sides). That was his point.
JP
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