I have a 1917 German Luger (ERFURT). It has all matching numbers (19) inclu...

LK1963 avatar
4 years ago #1
LK1963
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I have a 1917 German Luger (ERFURT). It has all matching numbers (19) including the clip. The pistol is in very good condition with little or no rust. The strawing is very good. The holster is in very good condition as well. My question: The holster has a braided leather tail coming down from the bottom of it. Have been told various stories about what this represents. Was wondering if someone on here could give me their input? I am new on here and at work so don't have pictures right now, but will follow up with them in the future.

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4 years ago #2
Mauser/Luger
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Hi
Need photos of the eurfurt luger for value. Most all were refurbed for police use after WWI

The leather braid means absolutely nothing..the Germans never put any braid on holsters....that an American GI/cowboy add on

Value is in the gun is in the photo

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4 years ago #3
LK1963
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That's strange. I inherited this pistol from my grandfather-in-law. He was in the war. The story he told me was he found the pistol in a barn in Germany. He stated they were instructed not to pick them up due to possible boobeytraps, but did so anyway. Have the original paperwork from him bringing it home. He also had a german letter that was tucked away inside the holster. He told me he had it translated and it was from a german wife to her husband who was an officer. Somehow that letter has been lost since his passing. Anyway, he was not a gun guy and had this stored away for many years. He knew that I loved guns so one day while working on some projects for him, he pulled it out and I almost choked. Tried to buy it from him but wouldn't sell it. After his passing I found out he left it to me. So, knowing that he brought it back and had done nothing but store it makes me wonder if this could be a US add on. I do appreciate your input and will have pictures posted soon.

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4 years ago #4
Mauser/Luger
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Did he say he never put the leather braid on it? An American could have hid it there to go back to get it later...and did not get back...also stories are not actually how things really happened...I know I was a COL in three wars,,,

Let me see a photo of it if its so important about the leather braid....has no German significance at all....its the gun that is important ..and the paper work...holster has value only if it is not modified with any holes or stuff added....from a collector point of view....no pays for any story at all..please keep this out of the question of value...I cannot evaluate family stories....only guns and paperwork

Work with me here I have been collecting German guns like this for 30 years....and we will get to the end of what you want....dollar value....

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4 years ago #5
LK1963
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Took some pictures this morning but the close ups did not turn out well. Following are some of the pistol, holster and documentation. Will try to get a different camera for the close ups.

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4 years ago #6
LK1963
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Here is a better picture from the top. I have more and if there is something specific you would like to see, let me know.

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4 years ago #7
Mauser/Luger
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Hi
well just as I thought you have a typical late WWI Erfurt. Some American has put a cowboy coll pant loop braid...only found on US and GI 45 Holsters.

Gun is about 85%....but orginal value 1500

hoster would be 400...but now 250 with braid Sorry

Add 150 for cleaning and tool.

add 200 for original paper work....

so about 2100 retail total ..if you can find a luger collector for the period

Nice historical set there...suggest you keep it and hand it on

Check out my blog on Imperial lugers etc

IF this helps give a green thumbs up ok?
Thanks

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LK1963 avatar
4 years ago #8
LK1963
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Thank you for getting back to me. In all honesty, have no intentions of selling, just wanted to find out more about the gun/holster combination. Was a bit surprised at the 85% you gave it. The pictures really don't do the pistol justice due to my lack of photography skills. However, you are the expert and I certainly appreciate your input.
PS - Thank you for your past service, sir, and hope you had a great 4th of July.

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4 years ago #9
Mauser/Luger
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Yes clearer photos could raise condition to 90%..cant see too good...straw colors looks strong though.
Glad to help

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1 month ago #10
Mark
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There were a number of types of Luger Pistols to begin with, The first lugers producedwere commerical models like the model 1900 and they were produced in 7.65 Luger aka (.30 Luger) As Americans call them The Toggles on these pistols are different they are not checkered and appear to be scalloped. In fact germany if I recall was not the first nation to adopt the Luger as a Military Side Arm, a number of Countries adopted the Luger Pistol as an Official Side arm, Portugal, Bulgaria, Switzerland are but a few, The Luger competed againt the Browning model 1905 in 45 Acp and follow on Models , including the Model 1911, and from these trial to of the rarest Lugers were produced in .45 Acp, I know one is valued at $1.000.000.00 Million Dollars, A number of Commerical Model Lugers were produced and sent to the states and is stamped with an American Eagle, this is the American Model pre-WWI. in fact I have seen a few Cowboy Pictures with Cowboys in the early 1900's carrying the Luger Pistol. The Imperial German Navy, KreigsMarine began Trials for a New Service Pistol, they Adopted the Luger known as the Model 1906, Chambered in 9mm Parabellum, barrel is around Six Inches, and it has a rear Adjustible Sight and if I recall these pistols have a Grip Safety, as do a number of Swiss Models and Commerical Models. The Imperial German Armee began its Trials soon Afterwords and adopted The Luger Pistol as well the Barrel is I believe 4.5 Inches fixed rear sight , produced By Erfurt, DWM, Mauser, Kriegoff, Etc. Than there is the Artillery Model , the rear sight is mounted over the begining of where the barrel starts and is of Carbine style design they were produced only during the First World War as was the Navy Model. Thus at least From Germany you have at least three types of Holsters to begin with, the Navy Holster, The Armee holster, and the Artillery Holster, there is also the Uhlan Holster that has a carry strap and was worn over the shoulder and the holster was worn on the left side , because Uhlans were Horse Mounted, You have American Military Style Holsters, American Civilian Holsters, Bulgarian, Swiss, Finnish, etc Manufactured Holsters, some of these Holsters are worth some money as well, German Navy Holsters originals $2,495.00, another $4,995.00, German Armee WWI Holster $375.00, Danish Luger Holster $500.00, German Armee WW2 Holster $495.00, German Artillery Holster $450.00, $1,100.00, $295.00 , Dutch Luger Holster $3,500.00, another $!,795.00 , $395.00, Commerical Luger Holsters $400.00, $595.00, $300.00, $1,000.00. are some prices on luger holsters that are original, so the one commentor does not know what he was talking about, there are hard shell and soft shell luger holsters, as far as I know the German Military used the hard shell varity, The German P08 Holsters the flap of the Holster is secured by a strap that has a belt Buckle, if you open the Flap you will notice a second strap that goes into the the Holster this is desigened for the user to grab and lift the P08 Luger pistol out of the Holster. The Artillery Holsters ar silghtly different the starp that locks the flap of the holster in place is secured by a brass knob , there is no belt buckle, by the way a large number of Artillery luger Holsters were converted/Shortend to P-08 Length during WWI. Almost Forgot They also produced Luger Carbines, barrels were 18 to 20 inches in Length, they Forend Stocks, wood was high Grade usually and the Artillery Model Style rear Sight, Also During WW1 Artillery Models were issued to StrumTruppen , i.e. Shock troops, They were also issued with 32 Round Drum Magazines, also wood stocks were attached to the Holsters and these stocks were mounted to the Pistol, Almost all Lugers were fitted with Slots to attach a stock, however in Practice that was rare, howere going into WW2 Nazi Germany did produce some Light Brown Leather Holsters with Stocks attached to for Mounting on the Standard Model P08 Luger

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1 month ago #11
Mauser/Luger
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You replied with a shotgun blast of random luger info on a string 3 years old...none of which show accurate distinctions between types and makes of lugers...prices do not reflect this guest's altered and modified holster...etc...just random facts having no coherence at all...you must have lots of time on your hands

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