3 years ago#1
kdykes_87
Guest

I recently purchased a ruger m77 30.06 appears to be circa 1971-1973 possibly the scope rail is milled into the reciever there is no t under the bolt handle no warning on the barrel just sturm ruger & co inc. it also is in great to excellent condition having only minor aesthetic dings. it also has a bushnell scope sportview wide angle 9x also the gun is very light weighing in around 7.5 lbs with scope . no black on gun any where except ruger emblem under pistol grip portion of the stock, with the exception of the bluing of the barrel and components. i would like an approximate value of the rifle w/ and w/o the scope.

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3 years ago#2
JP@AK
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kdykes_87 wrote:
appears to be circa 1971-1973

Actually, the serial number indicates manufacture in 1971. This gun may be early enough to have a Douglas barrel. In the early days, Ruger did not make its own barrels, but contracted that work out to Douglas and later to Wilson. The Douglas barreled guns are considered to be the best. QC was very consistent on these barrels.

no warning on the barrel just sturm ruger & co inc.

Yes, this would be a "pre-warning" rifle.

possibly the scope rail is milled into the reciever

Well, it either is or it isn't. Ruger made both varieties, but the vast majority had the integral bases. You can tell at a glance. The "round top" version will have blocky-looking bases mounted to the top of the receiver by screws and the scope rings are attached to them. If the scope rings simply clamp into the milled top of the receiver, the gun has integral bases.

the gun is very light weighing in around 7.5 lbs with scope

That would be correct for the standard M77 with walnut stock. The early Ultra Light weighed about a pound less and was identified by the black fore end tip.

has a bushnell scope sportview . . . i would like an approximate value of the rifle w/ and w/o the scope.

Unfortunately, the Bushnell scope adds nothing to the value of this gun. A lower end scope is simply a non-entity when it comes to resale on medium to high end rifles.
A year or so ago there was a guy making the rounds of gun shows with brand new, still in the box with all accessories, pre-warning Ruger Model 77 rifles. He was asking - and getting - $500 each for them. To tell you the truth, I thought it was a petty good deal. While the books show the value at a bit less for the Model 77 generally, a pre-warning gun, especially one with a Douglass barrel, is a bargain at $500.

I hope this helps.
Regards,
JP
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3 years ago#3
kdykes_87
Guest

yes sir that helped alot any way to tell if this has the douglas barrel the only engraving on the barrel say sturm ruger&co inc and some punctuation with it. also closer to the receiver is .30-06 maybe one proof mark would have to take another closer look.

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3 years ago#4
JP@AK
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Hi
Excellent question! Unfortunately, I don't believe Douglass marked the barrels in any identifiable way. I just checked my examples and neither the Douglass nor the Wilson are marked. My guess is that Ruger specified that they not be so marked when they ordered them (but that is just a guess).
The Ruger folks are pretty accommodating. You might try using the email query address found on the company website. Give them the serial number and see if they will tell you who manufactured your barrel. I have never asked this question, but when I have sought information from that source, they have always returned my email courteously and promptly and have been very forthcoming with information. So far as I can tell, this has not changed, even with Bill Ruger's passing.
The only issue would be whether specific records were kept that would allow them to answer the question factually, but I strongly suspect they will know.
Good luck. And if you find out anything, please let me know.
Regards,
JP

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3 years ago#5
kdykes_87
Guest

ok so i am still waiting on ruger to tell me however did some more research and what i have found is that ruger no.1 and m77 up to 1973 or 70-45000 serial would have a douglas barrel. Guess my question is how would having a douglas barrel affect the price of the gun. It was previously appraised at or around 500.

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3 years ago#6
JP@AK
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Yes, that time frame is correct. Sometime in late 1973 or early 1974, Ruger switched to Wilson barrels. The exact date is probably a little squishy, because they would have used up stock on hand.
In my opinion and experience, guys who care about this stuff will pay a premium for a gun known to have a Douglas barrel. Wilson's QC just was not up to the same level and some Wilson barrels have trouble hitting a barn side from indoors - others are quite accurate, but that's the problem: you can't know until you shoot a few rounds through one from the bench. We never had this problem with the Douglas barrels.
Personally, I would gladly pay a $100 premium for a Douglas barreled M77 over a Wilson barreled example in the same condition. The Average Joe gun buyer might not (and this includes some gun shop owners). As previously stated, I think $500 is an excellent price for a Douglas-equipped M77, from a buyer's perspective. If you plan to sell this gun, I would suggest pricing it at $600 or more.
Also, don't forget that we are talking private sales here. If you take it to a pawn shop or local gun shop, they will not even begin to offer you full value. They can't. They are in the business to make money, so they have to be able to mark the gun up for resale.
I hope this is helping you think through the issue.
Regards,
JP

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3 years ago#7
kdykes_87
Guest

been very helpful thank you very much!

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1 year ago#8
JKM70B1
Guest

I see this is an old post. But it was somewhat helpful to me. I've aquired a mint condition 1968 Ruger M77 serial number 1079, chambered in .243 Win from my father who was given it new by his father in 68. It also has the original Redfield 3x-9x scope on it, which is also mint. Is there any value info you could give me on the rifle. I would assume being a first year production model, and being that it is in 90-100% condition, that it would be worth more than a newer model...
-Jon

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1 year ago#9
JP@AK
Guru
Blogs: 20
Forum: 15,898
Votes: 491

Hello
I don't think the "first year" thing really makes any difference. Guns are not stamps or coins. The market simply does not work like that in most cases.
However, as explained above, the fact that it almost certainly has a Douglas barrel will make a difference to those in the know. The problem is finding someone who understands the production history. I would give you the same advice I gave the previous writer.
JP

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