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6 years ago#1
jefferson3854
Fresh Member
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I am interested in identification of the subject shotgun, but cannot find this shotgun in a pump. It has an angel like figure on either side, and "Pietro Beretta Silver Pigeon, 12 gauge.
Inherited several years ago. It is used, good condition. Would like to know year(s) this shotgun was marketed and estimated value if known.

Posted on Beretta
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5 years ago#2
Another Silver Pigeon ...
Guest

It sounds like you may have the same shotgun I have. I did some digging on it when I was working on it (the gun had been frozen for about 2 years) and came up with the following:

1. The gun was manufactured for the public from approximately 1960 to 1972

2. New, it sold for approximately $96 and currently is worth approximately $250

3. There is no manual for taking it apart and reassembling it (it took me 4 days to take it apart, clean it up, and get it working again)

4. Beretta does not carry replacement parts for it, and, in fact, does not even like to admit to having made it (it took me close to 15 minutes on the phone to get them to admit to having manufactured it, after offering to give the customer service rep the serial number)

5. The model name for it, through Beretta, is officially the Silver Pigeon SL 2

Hope this helps. If you have any other questions, feel free to email me: <email> and I'd be happy to discuss the gun with you further.

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5 years ago#3
scott
Guest

i have the very same gun and am having the same problem you are ..they seem to be rare not much info on them i do know they are from about 1960 however

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5 years ago#4
scott
Guest

i have the very same gun and theres not much info all i have so far its from around 1960 ..they are a really nice shotgun i love mine and would like to know the worth if any plz !!! thanks ...Scott

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5 years ago#5
bigcurt
Wiz
Blogs: 5
Forum: 5,160
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hello guys,,well beretta proably spent more developeing the pump line than they could sell them for and values for them are around the prices for remingtons 870's ,,i guess they didn't like anything with there name on it being so cheap..lol..lol..they want to be thought of as the high dollar o/u and auto loader makers and to have something with there name on it ONLY be worth 300-350 well thats just not there style i guess,,,never owned one but from what i can see they look like a pretty nice shotgun..and if ya like it and it brings home the game i can't figure why it's such a closet gun in there eyes ..lol..
bigcurt

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4 years ago#6
bencam84
Guest

Im pretty shure i have this same shot gun and also cannot find info on it i have had it for years and it is one of the best shot guns i own the only down side is that it will only hold 3 shells i am going to attempt to take it apart to see it there it a plug in it but if you could email me if there was any thing that i shouldnt mess with it would bee apreciatted thaks my email is <email> my name is Ben thanks

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4 years ago#7
jerry
Guest

hey i know this post is really old, but i need help... i can find a way to take off the face plate or remove the trigger assembly and bolt.... the gun needs cleaning bad, the firing pin is rather gummed up any tips available would be appreciated... is the "screw" underneath "SILVER PIGEON 12 Gauge" supposed to come out, it twists but doesn't come out, but on the opposite side of the gun i can push on the other side of the screw or pin and elevate the head slightly but i can't knock it out... i took off the barrel and butt of the gun and the trigger guard will move slightly but it seems to be pivoting around that screw.

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4 years ago#8
kcbuck
Guru
Blogs: 22
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Jerry:
Have you tried using a strong magnetic tool / part retriever? I have used these in the past and sometimes they work and sometime you have to get a little aggressive with those pesky screws. If it twists, it's loose and should come out unless it's a quarter-turn and release type fastener. Another option would be, to use a small flat tip screwdriver and gently pry the screw up while turning the screw with another screwdriver.... Once you have it out getting it back in may be a problem, if so try these;
1. If Metal - rethread the hole per the new screw's threading requirements, some many "threads per inch"....
2. If Wood - wood glue toothpicks into the screw hole and trim the toothpicks flush with the surface. You can re-insert the screws after 30 minutes or so and tighten....
Good Luck,
kcbuck

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4 years ago#9
taylor
Guest

that screw you are speaking of is not a screw....it's a drift pin made to look like a screw...use a pin punch and knock it out...just like ya do on an 870 pump...to seperate the fore end from your bolt ...there's a small hole in the left side of the receiver...pull the forend all the way back and you will see a small detent ball through that small hole..use a small punch or a small nail and push down on that detent ball while you gently push forward on the forend...that will free your forend rod from your bolt...once you remove the trigger plate......the bolt will come out the back of the receiver....hope I've helped ya

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3 years ago#10
g.davis
Guest

The shotgun is a 5 shot. The knurled end of the magazine **** off. Left hand thread.. Two shot plug is inside

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3 years ago#11
travis spears ...
Guest

my father gave me this shotgun when i was a kid and a friend of mine took it to pikket weaponery in newberry florida 10 years ago they estemated the value in the 12 hundred dollar range couldnt believe it neither but that was 10 years ago might pull it out and take it up again this week

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3 years ago#12
Clark Kent
Guest

That screw is actually a grudgeon which is a pin. Use a wood dowel on the "screw head" side and smack it with a rubber mallet to drive it out.

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3 years ago#13
Clark Kent
Fresh Member
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According to the factory literature the gun holds 3 shells in the tube. One in the chamber would make 4 shots. ??

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2 years ago#14
Robert meek
Guest

Lol Wow... I have the same gun here to. I purchased it for 100.00 dollars when I was 16 years old. I bought it here in rochester. It has been a great gun for me, and in fact it still works just fine... but it sounds extremely loud and kicks like a muel. I was 16 in 1966.

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2 years ago#15
Robert meek
Guest

Clark I think it holds four and one in the chamber for 5/

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2 years ago#16
Xavier Martin
Guest

I have the same gun and just sold it for 300 it's a very nice gun got it from my grandpa but it has a lot of kick to it

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2 years ago#17
Ralph
Guest

I also have the Bretta 12 Gauge Silver pigion which I purchased in 1960 for $75.00. It does hold 5 shells without the plug which can be take out from the front ende of the chamber. My shotgun is in excelent condition and has brought down a lot of game in its hay day. IT is a excelent shotgun.Still cannot figure out why it sold so cheep. The store manager said he could not sell it and just wanteed to get rid of it so I think he sold it to me at cost.
I am now looking to see if I can purchas a slug barrel for this shotgun. Any info?

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2 years ago#18
Chris
Guest

What is the shell length of the beretta silver pigeon sl-2 and can u shoot slugs with the gun...

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2 years ago#19
Ralph
Guest

Chris, I have shot slugs with my Beretta 12 Guage pump shotgun. My shotgun has a full chock barrel. But the slugs I use had the riffeling on the slugs. The new guns today are riffled and are much more accurate. That is why I had asked if they make a riffled barrel for the Silver Pigeon. I never did recieve a reply to that question.

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2 years ago#20
Silverback of Norway
Guest

Just for record: I bought my Beretta Silver Pigeon pump
in 1962 here iNorway. As far as I can recall I paid nok 400 (equal to less than usd 60 those days). It has worked flawlessly all the time, except some 5-6 years ago some part broke preventing the breech to lock. I discovered then that Beretta spare parts for this shotgun were no longer available. I thus had a new piece made and installed and, including a full "service-overhaul", that amusement cost me more than 3 times the purchase price back in 1962. But I was happy nevertheless. I love this shotgun with a full choke barrell. I bought another one 2nd hand to have spare parts if I or those who inherit will need another repair.
I also discovered that you can easily and without tools
take the barrell out and replace it with another. That is why I chose the secondhand one I bought having a 3/4 choke barrell. Now I feel better firing steel shots with that one.
2nd hand prices here in our market are the equivalent of some usd 250-300. It never was an expensive shotgun
- and they are not that rare even today, so I think that price level is fair for a well kept 2nd hand opportunity. And remember it is a Beretta product and as such you will get value for the money anyhow.
I love mine - perhaps not at least because it was my first ever shotgun. Today I have these to pump-Silver Pigeons and a modern o/u Silver Pigeon 686. And a Beretta single barrel, folding 12/70 made in 1974 is on its way into my weapon "wardrobe". It is the "Monocanna Ripieghevole"- anopther very light shotgun which in 12/70 certainly kicks like a mule. But I am experienced enough to pay no attention to that. I enjoy shooting and hunting and tackle recoil.
Take care !

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2 years ago#21
Ralph
Guest

Hi Silverback, I also love my Beretta Silver Pigeon 12 gauge. The original question I had was is there a rifled barrel for hunting deer made to fit this shot gun. My 12 gauge shot gun is light weight and in great condition. The only problem I had was...I let my gun to my cousin to hut pheasants and he dropped it and brook the plate on the back of the shoulder stock and chipped a small part from the wood stock at the bottom which I glued back in place, re-stained and finished. But had to put a boot on the stock. Which I do not like. Would like to get a new plate if possible.
By the way the slugs are 2 3/4"
. Ralph

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2 years ago#22
Silverback of Norway
Guest

Whether it is possible to get a rifled barrell I do doubt very much, but admittedly I would not know. Interesting that you state you would need one and hunt deer with it. Presuming you are an American (?) hunting then on the American continent any species of deer at yours will be much bigger/heavier than the smallest deer we have - the Roe deer - and which is the only deer we may hunt with a shotgun. All other deer we have to hunt with rifles - such as the European deer (cousin of your White Tail), Rein deers (Caribous)and Moose.
I know of hunters who go hunting Ptarmigans in the high mountains during hunting time for Reindeers are bringing slugs with them just in case they come across Reindeer that might have been injured(by a bad shot or broken legs/accidents etc) in order to cut their pains. Otherwise slugs are not widely used here.
Back to your Beretta pump: It may be possible perhaps to get hold of a 2nd hand gun here which is not functioning (and thus cheap) but with the wood and/or plate in good condition....? I will keep it in mind and look for such a possibility here - and let you know in case I come across something worth considering...(perhaps??).
To ship across the wood I presume will meet with few obstacles - compared to exporting a complete gun, that is...(?)Not to mention shipping just the butt plate.

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2 years ago#23
Thomas
Guest

In 1960 I was in the US Navy and in Italy and bought the Silver Pigeon Pump from the Beretta Factory and have the factory documents. I am now in my 70s and still have mine as it was the first shotgun I bought. Still shoots good and has been treated well thru the years. Great gun.

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2 years ago#24
Ralph
Guest

Hi Thomas,
Sounds like we are all in our 70's LOL In our area we can only hunt with shotguns using slugs. I hunted with my grandson this year and we both were using 20 gauge shotguns and we both shot a deer within minutes of each other. Both of the shotguns had scopes and rifled barrel's and brought down the deer quickly. What an experience. Still would like to fit that Silver Pigeon with a rifled barrel.

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2 years ago#25
Silverback of Norway
Guest

Hi Ralph,
I cannot provide you with a rifled barrel for your Silver Pigeon pump unfortunately
You're right abt age though - born 1942.

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2 years ago#26
Ralph
Guest

Hi Silverback,
Close...I was born 1939. I guess I was just lucky to be at the right place at the right time to purchas this shotgun for $75.00 I also purchased a Winchester model 70 with a packmayer scope that had a tipoff mount for $125.00 at the same time. They both served me well. Shot a lot of deer in northern Wisconsin with that rifel. Too many to count. What town in Norway are you from?
By the way if I remember correctly..to take apart and clean the shotgun you have to take the stock off and then I think I could disassemble the pump assembly. I have not done this now for some time as I have not used it for several years.

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1 year ago#27
bohntress
Guest

Can I ask what the serial number is on your silver pigeon? I am trying to age mine but can't find anywhere to get this info. My serial number is 019242. My dad bought it for me used around 1970/early 1971. I was a little over 15. We use to go and bust two boxes of clay pigeons every Sunday for two years. It was great.

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1 year ago#28
Ralph
Guest

Hi bohntress, My Silver pigeon was purchased in 1959 and its S/N is 003721 so I hope this helps you. I don't think they made these shot guns many years and I don't think they made many of them also. I did stop at a Beretta booth at a sport show and asked one of the Beretta reps about the shot gun and they all declined to answer. They said they knew nothing of a pump shot gun named Silver Pigeon. With that said...Beretta is known for their automatics and side by sides or double barreled shot guns. I think they just tested the market for a short time with this pump. It was not well receive at that time so they stopped making them.

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1 year ago#29
Silverback of Norway
Guest

To find out the production year of your Beretta pump "Silver Pigeon" is "piece of cake":
Take the barrel out. Somewhere amongst a lot of other marks and numbers you will find a(most likely) two letter
code - such as for example "XV" which is 1959.
Find what is there on yours and just google: "Beretta Year Codes" and you will find there a list of Beretta production year codes (Italian year codes actually).
If you meet with dificulties pls let me know.
The S/no. will not be easy to use to establish production year - unless you have a full list from the factory you will just be guessing I think.
(One of) Mine f.inst. has serial number 010533 and is built in 1959 (I.e. "XV&quot.

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1 year ago#30
Ralph
Guest

Hi Silverback, Thanks for the info.This should help all of us determine what year our shotguns were produced.

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