1911A1 Remington Rand w/ Colt Slide

Jack D avatar
6 years ago #1
Jack D
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Greetings! I am looking for help placing a value on an arsenal rebuild or so-called Frankengun.

I acquired it from a friend who's father served in USMC during WWII and Korean War. It is unknown if it is his service weapon or if he acquired it after he left service.

The gun is a 1945 Model 1911A1 Remington Rand frame Serial No. 2400477 with Colt slide. I estimate the NRA Condition as "Good." It is fully functional, wear evident on barrel and lugs, minor dings and scrapes on outside surfaces, light rust under grips, front sight missing; unmarked magazine, parkerized finish is good with a two-tone effect toward the muzzle. A picture is worth 1,000 words, so I've attached some.

After reviewing this site and others, I estimate the value of the gun, if all original and matching, to be around $1,000 - $1,500 (thank you bigcurt!). I am wondering how to value the gun since it does not have matching components, at least the slide does not match the frame. I did not detect any markings on the barrel, so I'm not sure if it is correct, but it appears consistent with the overall condition of the gun (clean bore with outside wear). I located a NOS Remington Rand slide for $400. Would it be fair or appropriate to reduce the estimated value of a complete, matching gun by the cost of a replacement, or is it still a Frankengun?

Thank you in advance for any guidance and assistance that might come my way.

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1644 avatar
5 years ago #2
1644
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it seems you have a shooter, why put $400 into it ?
it works well with the present slide. during war time many guys stripped their pistols and put them into a vat or container to clean. the pistol parts dryed, oild and put back together. So, savage slides went on colt frames and colt slide went on Ithaca frames. and that's how the mismatch started. During the korean war we did the same thing. we stripped our 45's and put the parts in a boiling water korean cooking pot. cleaned, oiled and put back together, not even trying to match proper parts.

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Jack D avatar
5 years ago #3
Jack D
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Thanks 1644, I saw that you commented on my other post too. I agree 100% with you that I have a shooter, and I don't intend to do anything to the gun except shoot and maintain it (and restake a front sight), but I won't replace the slide. In fact, I think that learning how you and your comrades cleaned your weapons gives the weapon special meaning and character that cannot be replaced.

But I still need some help. I am looking for advice about how to value it with non-matched parts, and thought that maybe the cost of a correct replacement slide would be a proper deduction. Intuitively I would estimate it to have lower value than the same gun with a matching Remington Rand slide - but how much lower? I would be interested in your opinion on that. Thanks again for your attention and help. Jack

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1644 avatar
5 years ago #4
1644
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45's today, even 'shooters' are selling for rediculous prices.
your's might commmand $800 +
Go to Gunsamerica.com search for 45's. check 45 on sale (and condition) and match to your pistol. give you an idea of value.

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4 years ago #5
Greg
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Greetings, I have a Remington slide on a Colt Receiver. Serial #953661 with a G.H.D in back of trigger.UNITED STATES PROPERTY M1911A1 U.S. ARMY. It has the cross cannons on the right side behind the top hand guard.Would be willing to trade for a Colt slide in excellent condition.

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4 years ago #6
john
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last year I bought a Colt slide for $350 for my 45 ACP projest. So you know the bucks invoilved with prices on Colt slides. Less likely to get a Colt slide for a
remington slide...bbut not impossible.

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4 years ago #7
Jack
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Greetings Greg. Sounds like we both have mismatched slides (or frames, depending on your perspective). I might be interested in a trade if the slides can be interchanged without problems. Your slide appears to be in excellent condition; mine is good but shows wear. It was and is a working gun. I live in the Central Valley of CA; whereabouts are you located? Maybe we could meet sometime and compare slides. You can email me at <email> , and I can forward additional pics of the slide, I've attached a couple here. Jack

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4 years ago #8
Greg
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Thanks for giving me a reply back. Yes I,m interested but maybe you could possibly answer my question. I recently took my M1911A1 to a gun show and some of the dealers were really impressed with it. One Dealer offered me 2500.00 dollars for it. It was my Dad's and he passed away 16 Sept,2011. When I first got the pistol from home I took it to a gun dealer where I live and he offered me up to 3000.00 dollars for it. My question to you is there something I,m missing about the pistol thats rare because it is a mixmatch M1911A1. I was looking through the gun forums and just about everybody said a mixmatch top value would be around 800.00 dollars.Could it be that the serial #953661 only has 6 numbers.I really don't care what the value would be but the "history" behind it. These gun dealers have to know its a mixmatch don't they !

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4 years ago #9
john
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Greg
your pistol is a remington made in 1943.

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4 years ago #10
Greg
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John, thanks for trying to help me.I don't know much about guns but the intials behind the trigger are G.H.D. meaning the receiver was made Colt. If the receiver was made by Remington Rand the intials should be FJA the inspector at that time. I,m kinda confused wouln't that make it a mixmatch ? Any other information you could provide would help.

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bigcurt avatar
4 years ago #11
bigcurt
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the frame may have been made by colt ,,the pistol falls into a catagory of where colt duplicated remingtons serial numbers during 1943 between serial numbers 916405-958100 so it is possible the frame was made by colt useing the remington serial number block ,,this could be why theres so much intrest in the pistol,,it may be a duplicate numbered pistols made by colt then a remington slide was put on it later on..or its a correct remington made pistol ,,there tough to tell whats correct and whats not if your not a 1911 collector ,,i'd leave it like it is with the intrest you've gotten from dealers ,,someone knows more than there telling ya on this one ,, for them to be makeing these kind of offers ,,lol

also i had a tough time telling answering your question because you put it in another posters question and i was reading parts of both posts,,next time please start your own post so it isn't as confuseing when we read it ,,lol..
bigcurt

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KerryL avatar
4 years ago #12
KerryL
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The frame was made by Colt. Both the GHD Ordnance markings and style of serial number markings prove it.

While I'm the first to admit that there are esoteric variations of m1911/1911A1's that can dramatically affect the gun's values that I am blissfully unaware of, I know of nothing that would bring the value of that pistol up to $2500 or $3000.

My guess would be that folks at the show (most of which know a little bit about a whole lot of guns but only know a whole lot about very few guns, the gun in question likely not falling into the latter category) simply looked at the mint condition of the finish and looked the gun up in the book and saw the serial numbers fit for a Remington Rand and made their offer.

What puzzles me even more is that by that picture, the gun appears to be blued. The slide should have originally been finished with Du-Lite and the frame parkerized.

If you haven't been by my favorite 1911 forum, post your pic and question there and see what they think - most of these guys no a ton about these guns http://forum.m1911.org/forums.php

Kerry

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pacificballard avatar
4 years ago #13
pacificballard
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Geesh. You guys got me wanting to dig mine out. It's a Remington with a serial number matching barrel. But it does have GHD on it from what I recall. From what I can see the only parts that may not be origingal are the trigger and backstrap with the lanyard loop hole.

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4 years ago #14
mangvil
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Big curt is right, it falls into the duplicated numbers... as for the value if it is a colt that means it is one of 41,696 pistols in the Remington Rand serial range: <phone> ... With that number being relatively smaller today that makes your number a special one. and god help you if you can find the colt slide with matching numbers, if you did you might have a gun worth twice what you are being offered for it...

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4 years ago #15
Greg
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Thanks for the information. I have been doing a lot of research on my M1911A1 and found some interesting things about duplicate numbers between Colt and Remington Rand at that time frame. Thanks alot.

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DamanC avatar
4 years ago #16
DamanC
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You guys got me curious, so I dug my 1911s out of the safe and checked em. One seems to be a frankengun with a colt serial of 30110 and a Remington slide. It was one of my grandfathers favorite pistols, he actually preferred to shoot these over the 4 brand new 1911s he owned. What would this be worth?

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4 years ago #17
john
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pistol made in 1913. value depends on overall comdition. metal finish, bore condition, wear and tare, etc. go to GUNBROKER.COM punch in 45 pistols and see prices and conditions. this might help framing a price.

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4 years ago #18
mangvil
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DamanC- I would follow John's advice or take it in to a few different shops and see what they say (but remember they always low ball you when they offer to buy) but also you said it was your "Grandfathers Favorite" and that along with the date and history of the actual gun, shouldn't that make it a "priceless family heirloom." Unless you didn't care for him... I know I would never sell my Dad's 1903... but like john said it depends on condition and also known history i.e. if you can prove it was used in a war and if you have any documents, that raises the price a bunch.

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DamanC avatar
4 years ago #19
DamanC
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I probably should have mentioned it when I wrote my other post. I just felt i was being long winded. I never intend to sell my grandfathers guns. But sometimes curiosity strikes me like it did last nigh, so I just asked. But thanks for taking the time to answer I appreciate it.

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4 years ago #20
john
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DamanC

I neglected to mention my 45 pistol look up on your serial number indicated it was made by Colt OR Remington in 1913.......

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